Freedom Seekers are Authentic, Connect and Ooze Compassion

Freedom Seekers are Authentic, Connect and Ooze Compassion

According to Maslow and what is generally agreed in psychology, love and belonging are core drivers in human nature. Our need to feel appreciated, accepted and loved is so powerful that it can affect how we connect with others and our surroundings. This need is a beautiful yet fragile thing. The role of vulnerability is essential on your freedom seeking journey. Without fully connecting with the world authentically, we are left with a feeling of emptiness, loneliness, and imprisonment. Where is the freedom in that?

Nomadic Partnerships: How to make them work

Nomadic Partnerships: How to make them work

I think we have all been there… whether that is from traveling with a buddy, a romantic relationship, a friendship or a business partner. Or at least I have anyway. I have seen or had so many different relationships in my life that have been both amazing and a bit volatile. Over the years, I have done my bit to try and learn from volatile relationships and do my best to avoid them.

Freedom seeking and how it can help you be a philosopher and thus free!

Freedom seeking and how it can help you be a philosopher and thus free!

We are all freedom seekers. But what is freedom? Some people might choose a qualified freedom or others, an unrestricted one. Are you still free if it’s the former? Is it really freedom if it’s the latter? If we were all completely free, none of us would be; my freedom to enjoy a quiet park afternoon would be restricted by the freedom of my neighbour to play grime at full volume. John Stuart Mill, one of the fathers of liberalism, argued that one man’s freedom to swing his arms ended at another man’s nose.  But intuitively, we think freedom has to mean exactly that, unfettered, unrestricted, absolute freedom; it feels like almost an oxymoron to say ‘restricted freedom.’